nurbletumblr

my name's Kirk. I work in visual effects for tv commercials. I have a big mouth. Please enjoy.

longer shit talking: nurble.com

shorter shit talking: nurble twitter

mail: nurbleATmacDOTcom

Apr 12
Girl Talk: the Gallagher of the DJ world.

Girl Talk: the Gallagher of the DJ world.


Mar 31
Anyone hoping to start a racist themed restaurant should know that they’ll be competing with this joint in Ensenada.

Anyone hoping to start a racist themed restaurant should know that they’ll be competing with this joint in Ensenada.


Mar 25

cinephilearchive:

Krzysztof Kieślowski on the set of ‘A Short Film About Killing’ (‘Krótki film o zabijaniu’). Written by Krzysztof Kieślowski and Krzysztof Piesiewicz, the film was expanded from ‘Decalogue V’ of Kieślowski’s masterpiece television series ‘The Decalogue’ (‘Dekalog’). Stanley Kubrick described ‘Dekalog’ as the only masterpiece he could name in his lifetime.

“Regardless of the subject of my films… I am looking for a way of evoking in audiences feelings similar to my own: the physically painful impotence and sorrow that assail me when I see a man weeping at the bus stop, when I observe people struggling vainly to get close to others, when I see someone eating up the left-overs in a cheap restaurant, when I see the first blotches on a woman’s hand and know that she too is bitterly aware of them, when I see the kind of appalling and irreparable injustice that so visibly scars the human face. I want this pain to come across to my audience, to see this physical agony, which I think I am beginning to fathom, to seep into my work.”

‘A Short Film About Decalogue: An Interview with Krzysztof Kieslowski’ is an attempt to examine the universal messages offered by ‘Dekalog,’ as well as it’s idiosyncrasies. A must watch for fans of Kieślowski, and indeed fans of film in general. [Samuel Beckett]

“To tell you the truth, in my work, love is always in opposition to the elements. It creates dilemmas. It brings in suffering. We can’t live with it, and we can’t live without it. You’ll rarely find a happy ending in my work.”

(When asked what a director does) “I help.” —Krzysztof Kieślowski

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(via bbook)


Jan 6
theatlantic:

Sushinomics: How Bluefin Tuna Became a Million-Dollar Fish

Every year, on the first Saturday in January, Japan makes a grand statement to the global fishing community by putting an exorbitant price on the head of a single bluefin tuna. At the famous Tsukiji fish market in Tokyo, the first bluefin auction of the year represents many things: growing consumer demand for bluefin sashimi, the exploitation of natural resources, the collapse of a species, shortsightedness in the face of impending doom to the entire ocean, a depraved publicity stunt. 
In 2013, Kiyoshi Kimura, the owner of a Japanese sushi restaurant chain, paid $1.76 million for the first bluefin at Tsukiji, which weighed 489 pounds. Kimura had paid $736,000—a world-record price at the time—for the first tuna of 2012. That fish weighed 593 pounds. 
It’s no surprise, then, that journalists were steeling themselves for what was sure to come on January 4, 2014: If the past decade’s trend in pricing continued, this year’s first tuna would surely fetch more than a million dollars. But the Tsukiji fish market bucked tradition this weekend and sold its first tuna to Kimura, yet again, for a mere $70,000. That’s still way more money than most bluefin go for in Japan. But compared to what everyone was expecting—an extravagant sum to start off the new year and remind us that these are the most prized fish in the sea—that’s one crazy cheap tuna. 
Read more. [Image: Toru Hanai/Reuters]


When I lived in LA, I ate sushi about three times a week, because it was relatively inexpensive, fucking delicious, and I could always get somebody to come with me. I always knew I was helping to contribute to a global problem, but I didn’t really want to change my behavior, because, hey, delicious fish, right?In NY, there isn’t really cheap good sushi. There’s only very, very expensive adequate sushi, and anyone who says differently is lying (I haven’t been to Masa yet, but the people I know who have just shrug when I ask if it’s better than Yasuda).As a result, I’ve inadvertently modified my behavior for the better, and I feel pretty damn smug about it, until I go back to LA and eat sushi for nearly every meal. I have no idea what the point of this was, by the way. But the article was interesting, so read the rest if you haven’t already.

theatlantic:

Sushinomics: How Bluefin Tuna Became a Million-Dollar Fish

Every year, on the first Saturday in January, Japan makes a grand statement to the global fishing community by putting an exorbitant price on the head of a single bluefin tuna. At the famous Tsukiji fish market in Tokyo, the first bluefin auction of the year represents many things: growing consumer demand for bluefin sashimi, the exploitation of natural resources, the collapse of a species, shortsightedness in the face of impending doom to the entire ocean, a depraved publicity stunt

In 2013, Kiyoshi Kimura, the owner of a Japanese sushi restaurant chain, paid $1.76 million for the first bluefin at Tsukiji, which weighed 489 pounds. Kimura had paid $736,000—a world-record price at the time—for the first tuna of 2012. That fish weighed 593 pounds. 

It’s no surprise, then, that journalists were steeling themselves for what was sure to come on January 4, 2014: If the past decade’s trend in pricing continued, this year’s first tuna would surely fetch more than a million dollars. But the Tsukiji fish market bucked tradition this weekend and sold its first tuna to Kimura, yet again, for a mere $70,000. That’s still way more money than most bluefin go for in Japan. But compared to what everyone was expecting—an extravagant sum to start off the new year and remind us that these are the most prized fish in the sea—that’s one crazy cheap tuna.

Read more. [Image: Toru Hanai/Reuters]

When I lived in LA, I ate sushi about three times a week, because it was relatively inexpensive, fucking delicious, and I could always get somebody to come with me. I always knew I was helping to contribute to a global problem, but I didn’t really want to change my behavior, because, hey, delicious fish, right?

In NY, there isn’t really cheap good sushi. There’s only very, very expensive adequate sushi, and anyone who says differently is lying (I haven’t been to Masa yet, but the people I know who have just shrug when I ask if it’s better than Yasuda).

As a result, I’ve inadvertently modified my behavior for the better, and I feel pretty damn smug about it, until I go back to LA and eat sushi for nearly every meal.

I have no idea what the point of this was, by the way. But the article was interesting, so read the rest if you haven’t already.


"… At night, the ice weasels come."

From Love Is Hell by Matt Groening.

"… At night, the ice weasels come."

From Love Is Hell by Matt Groening.


tomoatmeal:

Here’s a hot tip to help you stay warm this winter! If you’re near death, swallow a whole bunch of corn kernels and then rearrange your will to specify that you want to be cremated at a low heat so that the popcorn pops out of your mouth and ears. Enjoy!

Glorious.

tomoatmeal:

Here’s a hot tip to help you stay warm this winter! If you’re near death, swallow a whole bunch of corn kernels and then rearrange your will to specify that you want to be cremated at a low heat so that the popcorn pops out of your mouth and ears. Enjoy!

Glorious.


Dec 16

Dec 13
hodgman:

I spent yesterday afternoon putting mustache hairs into little vials FOR YOU. 
RAGNAROK SURVIVAL KITS ship on 12/17 and may be ordered HERE. 
That is all. 

I’m fairly certain that the sandwich I make with the survival mayonnaise will be better than any I might make with the mustache clippings, but I guess there’s only one way to find out.

hodgman:

I spent yesterday afternoon putting mustache hairs into little vials FOR YOU. 

RAGNAROK SURVIVAL KITS ship on 12/17 and may be ordered HERE

That is all. 

I’m fairly certain that the sandwich I make with the survival mayonnaise will be better than any I might make with the mustache clippings, but I guess there’s only one way to find out.


engineeringisawesome:

Some more information on the 3D-Printed cast.

futuretechreport:

Cortex: The 3D-Printed Cast

After many centuries of splints and cumbersome plaster casts that have been the itchy and smelly bane of millions of children, adults and the aged alike the world over, we at last bring fracture support into the 21st century. The Cortex exoskeletal cast provides a highly technical and trauma zone localized support system that is fully ventilated, super light, shower friendly, hygienic, recyclable and stylish.

The cortex cast utilizes the x-ray and 3d scan of a patient with a fracture and generates a 3d model in relation to the point of fracture.

By Jake Evill

Oh hey, future! Welcome! We’ve been waiting for you.

(via hopefulveterinarian)


Oct 22

When someone says the next episode’s online will go smoothly

renderplease:

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